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Neil deGrasse Tyson
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From NASA’s always-spectacular Astronomy Picture of the Day, a glorious shot of Manhattanhenge by Neil deGrasse Tyson himself. (Tyson loves the annual event so much that he made it the center of his hand-drawn cartographic love letter to New York City.)
The second Manhattanhenge of 2014 takes place on Saturday, July 12, at 8:25pm EST.

From NASA’s always-spectacular Astronomy Picture of the Day, a glorious shot of Manhattanhenge by Neil deGrasse Tyson himself. (Tyson loves the annual event so much that he made it the center of his hand-drawn cartographic love letter to New York City.)

The second Manhattanhenge of 2014 takes place on Saturday, July 12, at 8:25pm EST.

In honor of Manhattanhenge this week, Neil deGrasse Tyson's hand-drawn homage, from the altogether wonderful Mapping Manhattan. 

In honor of Manhattanhenge this week, Neil deGrasse Tyson's hand-drawn homage, from the altogether wonderful Mapping Manhattan

Open Culture digs up the letter Carl Sagan sent to 17-year-old Neil deGrasse Tyson. Read the full story here.
Pair with Tyson on how Sagan shaped his life and continues to shape all of our lives.

Open Culture digs up the letter Carl Sagan sent to 17-year-old Neil deGrasse Tyson. Read the full story here.

Pair with Tyson on how Sagan shaped his life and continues to shape all of our lives.

The nature of scientific genius is to question what the rest of us take for granted, and then do the experiment.

The ever-wise Neil deGrasse Tyson adds to history’s finest definitions of science in the fifth episode of his Cosmos series.

Complement with this cultural history of genius, then revisit Carl Sagan’s golden rules of questioning.

A vital reminder from the fifth episode of Neil deGrasse Tyson's Cosmos series.
Perhaps Bertrand Russell put it best in his 10 commandments of learning, where he admonished:

Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found.

Pair with Carl Sagan’s toolkit for critical thinking.

A vital reminder from the fifth episode of Neil deGrasse Tyson's Cosmos series.

Perhaps Bertrand Russell put it best in his 10 commandments of learning, where he admonished:

Have no respect for the authority of others, for there are always contrary authorities to be found.

Pair with Carl Sagan’s toolkit for critical thinking.

Give a kid a book, and you change the world. In a way, even the universe.

In the third episode of his Cosmos series, Neil deGrasse Tyson echoes Carl Sagan even down to the timeless sentiment about books.

For good measure, complement with Maurice Sendak’s little-known and lovely posters on the joy of reading.

The human talent for pattern-recognition is a two-edged sword: We’re especially good at finding patterns, even when they aren’t really there — something known as false pattern-recognition.

We hunger for significance — for signs that our personal existence is of special meaning to the universe. To that end, we’re all too eager to deceive ourselves and others.

In the third episode of his fantastic Cosmos series, Neil deGrasse Tyson reminds us of how pattern-recognition both fuels our creativity and makes our minds mislead us.
Science works on the frontier between knowledge and ignorance. We’re not afraid to admit what we don’t know – there’s no shame in that. The only shame is to pretend that we have all the answers.
Neil deGrasse Tyson talks to Wired about his new Cosmos series.
Also see Tyson on your ego and the cosmic perspective. 

Neil deGrasse Tyson talks to Wired about his new Cosmos series.

Also see Tyson on your ego and the cosmic perspective

The idea that science is just some luxury that you’ll get around to if you can afford it is regressive to any future a country might dream for itself. Innovations in science and technology are the engines of the 21st-century economy; if you care about the wealth and health of your nation tomorrow, then you’d better rethink how you allocate taxes to fund science. The federal budget needs to recognize this.

It seems like right now, we’re leaning on the private sector to pick up that slack, with for-profit companies like SpaceX, for example. The private sector requires quarterly reports and annual returns on the investors’ capital. It’s not a 20-year baseline. It’s not even a five-year baseline.

If you really want to invest in the long-term health of a nation, the government needs to step in for the long-term returns on those investments.

Neil deGrasse Tyson tells it like it is in this Wired interview about his new Cosmos series. 

Also see how to save our science and Tyson’s superb Senate testimony on science funding

Imagination alone is not enough, because the reality of nature is far more wondrous than anything we can imagine.

This adventure is made possible by generations of searchers strictly adhering to a simple set of rules: Test ideas by experiment and observation; build on those ideas that pass the test; reject the ones that fail; follow the evidence, wherever it leads; and question everything.

Accept these terms, and the cosmos is yours.

Neil deGrasse Tyson kicks off Cosmoshis contemporary continuation of the Carl Sagan classic.
In the premiere of Cosmos, his contemporary continuation of the Carl Sagan classic, the inimitable Neil deGrasse Tyson adds to history’s finest definitions of science.
Cosmos airs Sundays at 9/8c.

In the premiere of Cosmos, his contemporary continuation of the Carl Sagan classic, the inimitable Neil deGrasse Tyson adds to history’s finest definitions of science.

Cosmos airs Sundays at 9/8c.

It all begins tonight. Are you ready?

Warm up with the Sagan classic.

(via jtotheizzoe)

sci-universe
A conversation with Neil deGrasse Tyson.
Pair with Carl Sagan on science and spirituality and a meditation on the subject from Alan Lightman. 

Neil deGrasse Tyson talks to Bill Moyers about science, religion, and the universe – the best thing since Jane Goodall’s conversation with Moyers on the same subject.

Also see Carl Sagan on science and spirituality and Alan Lightman on science and religion