Coursekit is now Lore.
What’s the Story?
A discovery engine for meaningful knowledge, fueled by cross-disciplinary curiosity.
A Brain Pickings project edited by Maria Popova in partnership with Noodle.
Twitter: @explorer
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Absolutely fantastic and culturally necessary read on our hidden biases, to which even the best-intentioned of us are susceptible.

Absolutely fantastic and culturally necessary read on our hidden biases, to which even the best-intentioned of us are susceptible.

I’ve travelled every way possible, and I’ve learned you need only two things (besides good health): some time and money.

[…]

Here is what I learned from 40 years of traveling: Of the two modes, it is far better to have more time than money.

When you have abundant time you can get closer to core of a place. You can hang around and see what really happens. You can meet a wider variety of people. You can slow down until the hour that the secret vault is opened. You have enough time to learn some new words, to understand what the real prices are, to wait out the weather, to get to that place that takes a week in a jeep.

Money is an attempt to buy time, but it rarely is able to buy any of the above.

Whoever utters “Kafkaesque” has neither fathomed nor intuited nor felt the impress of Kafka’s devisings. If there is one imperative that ought to accompany any biographical or critical approach, it is that Kafka is not to be mistaken for the Kafkaesque.

Cynthia Ozick in defense of Kafka.

Lighten up with Kafka for kids – definitely not Kafkaesque. 

“Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished,” absolutely gorgeous letterpress reminder from Holstee. For the perfect aesthetic-philosophical counterpart, pair with some humility from the oldest living things in the world. 

Nature does not hurry, yet everything is accomplished,” absolutely gorgeous letterpress reminder from Holstee. For the perfect aesthetic-philosophical counterpart, pair with some humility from the oldest living things in the world

Hemingway on how to become a good writer.

So this is amazing: German photographer and bike-lover Jonas Ginter made a 360-degree spherical panorama timelapse of himself riding around town, using 6 GoPro cameras and a 3D-printed mount.

Brilliant: Dinah Fried cooks and photographs meals from beloved books — Moby-Dick (above), Little Women, The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, and more:

Reading and eating are natural companions, and they’ve got a lot in common. Reading is consumption. Eating is consumption. Both are comforting, nourishing, restorative, relaxing, and mostly enjoyable. They can energize you or put you to sleep. Heavy books and heavy meals both require a period of intense digestion. Just as reading great novels can transport you to another time and place, meals — good and bad ones alike — can conjure scenes very far away from your kitchen table. Some of my favorite meals convey stories of origin and tradition; as a voracious reader, I devour my favorite books.

See more here.

Brilliant: Dinah Fried cooks and photographs meals from beloved booksMoby-Dick (above), Little Women, The Catcher in the Rye, Lolita, and more:

Reading and eating are natural companions, and they’ve got a lot in common. Reading is consumption. Eating is consumption. Both are comforting, nourishing, restorative, relaxing, and mostly enjoyable. They can energize you or put you to sleep. Heavy books and heavy meals both require a period of intense digestion. Just as reading great novels can transport you to another time and place, meals — good and bad ones alike — can conjure scenes very far away from your kitchen table. Some of my favorite meals convey stories of origin and tradition; as a voracious reader, I devour my favorite books.

See more here.

Our life has become so mechanized and electronified that one needs some kind of an elixir to make it bearable at all. And what is this elixir if not humor?
The science of humor and the humor of science in a brilliant 1969 reflection on laughter as an antidote to automation.
The Wizard of Oz reimagined by Lisbeth Zwerger, one of the most imaginative illustrators of our time — rare, gasp-gorgeous illustrations.

The Wizard of Oz reimagined by Lisbeth Zwerger, one of the most imaginative illustrators of our time  rare, gasp-gorgeous illustrations.

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.

The little-known art of Zelda Fitzgerald – pictured here, her painting of springtime at Washington Square Park.

Evolution happens like a movie, with frames moving by both quickly and gradually, and we often can’t see the change while it’s occurring. Every time we find a fossil, it’s a snapshot back in time, often with thousands of frames missing in between, and we’re forced to reconstruct the whole film. Life is what happens in between the snapshots.
When beholding a majestic 13,000-year-old Eucalyptus tree, how can human arrogance dare deny its reality under the blindness of dogma?
At a time when 40% of the American public don’t believe Earth is more than 6,000 years old, Rachel Sussman’s magnificent photographs of the oldest living things in the world stand not only as a masterpiece of art but also a masterpiece of science communication. 
If you read one thing today, make it this fantastic piece on how to cultivate practical wisdom. 

If you read one thing today, make it this fantastic piece on how to cultivate practical wisdom

The audience actually wants to work for their meal. They just don’t want to know that they’re doing that. That’s your job as a storyteller is to hide the fact that you’re making them work for their meal. We’re born problem solvers. We’re compelled to deduce and to deduct because that’s what we do in real life. It’s this well-organized absence of information that draws us in.

Pixar filmmaker Andrew Stanton in an altogether fantastic episode of NPR’s TED Radio Hour exploring what makes a great story

Complement with more secrets of storytelling from Vladimir Nabokov, Kurt Vonnegut and Neil Gaiman, then see the neurochemistry of storytelling and the dramatic art.

Madeleine L’Engle on creativity, writing, censorship, and the art of disturbing the universe – spectacular read.